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The Fourth and Fifth Growths of the1855 Classification!

Moving on in our ATXWS, 1855 classification series, we now enter the fourth and fifth growths.

Fourth growth wines are a step below the first, second, and third growths, but are still considered to be high-quality wines. These wines are often made from a blend of grape varieties, with Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc being the most common. Fourth growth wines are known for their bold flavors and sturdy tannins, which make them well-suited to aging.

Fifth growth wines are the lowest tier of wines in the 1855 classification, but this does not mean that they are of poor quality. In fact, many fifth growth wines are highly sought-after by wine enthusiasts for their excellent value and approachable flavors. Fifth growth wines are often made from the same grape varieties as fourth growth wines, but are generally lighter and more fruit-forward in style.

Some well-known fourth growth wines are is Château Saint-Pierre, St-Julien, Château Talbot, St-Julien, Château Branaire-Ducru, St-Julien, Château Duhart-Milon, Pauillac, and Château Pouget, Margaux.

As for fifth growth wines, Château Camensac is a well-regarded example. This wine is made from a blend of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, and Cabernet Franc. It is known for its ripe fruit flavors and elegant tannins, making it a great choice for those looking for a wine that is approachable and easy to drink.

In conclusion, fourth and fifth growth wines from the 1855 classification of Bordeaux are high-quality wines that offer excellent value for the price. While they may not be as prestigious as the first, second, and third growth wines, they are still worth seeking out for their bold flavors and approachable styles. Whether you are a wine connoisseur or just starting to explore the world of Bordeaux wines, fourth and fifth growth wines are a great place to begin.


Article Written By: Austin Texas Wine Society


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